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UK: Photographing UK’s Ugly Carrots

UK: Photographing UK’s Ugly Carrots

Most vegetables at the supermarket have been carefully selected and can be sold to consumers only because they’ve met strict aesthetic criteria. British photographer Tim Smyth’s book Defective Carrots demonstrates how discerning this scanning technology is. The book contains 56 photographs of optically deficient carrots deemed unfit for consumer consumption at a sorting farm in north Yorkshire. The scanner measures each carrot live on-screen as they rush by on a high-speed conveyor belt and rejects the ones that do not meet the pencil-straight standards for sellable carrots—about 10 to 20% of all carrots. While some carrots are extremely distorted and bizarre-looking, others may be off by only one degree. Some have black fungal growth, some are split down the middle and some have daintily crossed “legs” or strike oddly human-like poses. “Many people have told me these carrots are erotic,” Tim told Co.Design.
(Source: treehugger.com)